Indian Supreme Court Puts Sedition Law on Hold

Indian Supreme Court Puts Sedition Law on Hold

 

If we look at the data from 2010 to 2021, it is revealed that out of the five states where sedition was used the most, two were chief ministers of BJP and two of NDA's allies. The central government has told the Supreme Court that it is ready to review the sedition law. Now the Supreme Court has also said after the stand of the Center that until the government decides on the future of the sedition law, it will be repealed and its accused can also file a bail petition. With regard to this fast-paced attitude on the sedition law from the court and the Centre, questions are now being raised on its justification. In fact, the court has raised questions on the constitutional validity of this law on many occasions, as well as its misuse.
In such a situation, Amar Ujala will tell you why questions are being raised on the appropriateness of the sedition law and how there has been a tremendous jump in the case of sedition in the last 12 years. Especially how this matter increased rapidly under the rule of Modi government. Apart from this, since the time NCRB started publishing the data related to it, how much difference has been seen between these figures?
Know first- how many times this law was used in 12 years?
According to Article 14, a website containing data on sedition law from 2010 to 2021, 867 cases of sedition were registered in the country during this period. The website has told through District Court, High Court, Supreme Court, Police Station, NCRB report and other means that 13 thousand 306 people have been made accused in these cases. However, out of all the people against whom the case was registered, only three thousand people could be identified in the database.
This condition in 11 years, so what happened in Modi government?
According to the report, 595 sedition cases were registered till 2021 after the Modi government came to power in 2014. That is, out of the total cases registered since 2010, 69 percent were registered in the NDA government. If the total average of these cases is taken, then since 2010 on an average 68 cases were registered in the UPA government every year, while the NDA government registered an average of 74.4 cases every year.
How different is this data from NCRB?
For the first time, the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) started collecting data on sedition cases from 2014 itself. However, according to the NCRB data, only 399 cases of sedition were registered between 2014 and 2020 (data not available for 2021). Article 14 has shown 557 cases of sedition during this period itself (between 2014-20).
Article 14 has made it clear in its records that the NCRB data does not fully cover all cases of sedition. This is because of the cases in which many more clauses are used. The NCRB counts only those sections in such cases, which are of high magnitude.
What about the court's decisions in these cases?
In these 867 cases of sedition, only 13 people were found guilty. That is, out of the 13,000 who were made accused, only 0.1 percent were found guilty of sedition. However, the hardships faced by those trapped in these cases can be gauged from the fact that an accused has to spend an average of 50 days in jail till he is granted bail. At the same time, if someone had to approach the High Court for bail, it took an average of 200 days to get relief.
Which states have the most cases of sedition?
If we look at the data from 2010 to 2021, it is revealed that out of the five states where sedition was used the most, two were chief ministers of BJP and two of NDA's allies. In one there was the CM of the opposition party. While a total of 171 such cases were registered in Bihar after 2010, Tamil Nadu remained at number two. It was followed by Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand and Karnataka.

Talking about the accused, the maximum number of 4641 accused of sedition cases were made in Jharkhand. At the same time, 3601 in Tamil Nadu, 1608 in Bihar, 1383 in Uttar Pradesh and 509 in Haryana were made accused of sedition.

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